Migrants from Another World: Part 1

The disorientation of migrants on their route through the Americas

27 August 2020
Migrants crossing the Darién Gap, the geographical meeting point of North and South America.
Felipe Reyes / SEMANA
Migrants crossing the Darién Gap, the geographical meeting point of North and South America.
Felipe Reyes / SEMANA

I met Kamal on the morning of 16 January this year in Necoclí, a village of about seventy thousand people with a rough green sea and poor fishermen on the edge of the Gulf of Urabá, in the north-western corner of Colombia. Kamal was fleeing from Dhaka, Bangladesh, after religious extremists burned down his tea shop. His country has a Sunni Muslim majority, and, like much of the rest of South Asia, it has been affected by the ravages of global terrorism and the war against it, and by the sectarian demagogy of leaders in both hemispheres. These have led to criminal attacks on the homes, businesses and temples of Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim and Christian minorities. 

Every year, half a million Bangladeshis are forced to leave their country. Those exiled by violence, like Kamal, are joined by those displaced due to climate change, which has especially affected this low-lying and overpopulated country: increasingly frequent floods and landslides sweep the land from under their feet. 

Many of the migrants take refuge in neighbouring countries, seeking to rebuild their lives not too far away. Many, however, decide to leave for the Americas. Between 2017 and January 2019, 1,608 Bangladeshis requested refuge in Brazil.

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    María Teresa Ronderos is a writer with the Latin American Center for Investigative Journalism.

    Keywords: Migrants from Another World refugees Latin America migrants South Asia Africa African refugees
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