The Akal Takht’s call to ban RSS reiterates Sikhism’s long resistance to a Hindu Rashtra

15 October 2019
Well over a century after the question of Sikh identity was fully settled, the RSS continues to insist that Sikhism is not a religion but a sect of Hinduism, thereby antagonising the community.
SONU MEHTA / HINDUSTAN TIMES / GETTY IMAGES
Well over a century after the question of Sikh identity was fully settled, the RSS continues to insist that Sikhism is not a religion but a sect of Hinduism, thereby antagonising the community.
SONU MEHTA / HINDUSTAN TIMES / GETTY IMAGES

On 14 October, Giani Harpreet Singh, the chief of the Akal Takht, the highest temporal seat of Sikhism, called for a ban on the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh, during an interaction with journalists in Amritsar. Singh’s remark came in the backdrop of a statement by Mohan Bhagwat, the RSS chief, during an annual Sangh event the previous week, stating that “Bharat is Hindustan, a Hindu Rashtra” and that “all Bharatiyas are Hindus.” In response, Singh noted, “The remarks by RSS leaders are not in the interest of the nation. It would hurt and draw a new line of division in the country and destroy it.”

Historically, the RSS’s vision for a Hindu Rashtra has been in conflict with the Sikh faith and the Akal Takht. In 1985, the RSS had floated a Sikh wing called the Rashtriya Sikh Sangat. In the following excerpt, from an April 2018 piece on the RSS’s position on a separate religion for the Lingayats, Hartosh Singh Bal, the political editor at The Caravan, traced the backlash that the Sangat faced in Punjab when it began to advocate its ideology—the inseparability of Sikhs and Hindus. Bal wrote, “In Punjab, where the mix of religion and politics is often combustible, the Sangat’s activities remain one of the biggest sources of mobilisation for Sikh hardliners.”

The RSS’s ideologue and second chief, MS Golwalkar’s view of the Sikhs as “communalists” who are “tearing asunder” the golden thread of Hinduism has been the basis for much of the RSS’s activities among the Sikhs in Punjab. In 1985, at the height of the crisis in Punjab, the RSS floated a body called the Rashtriya Sikh Sangat. Initially, the Sangat was supposed to focus on spreading the message of a shared Sikh and Hindu heritage but in truth its aims were to propagate what Golwalkar had articulated: the inseparability of Sikhs and Hindus. The journalist Dhirendra Jha, in his book Shadow Armies, devotes a chapter to the Sangat (much of the work of the Sangat noted here relies on Jha’s exposition). Jha writes:

Hartosh Singh Bal is the political editor at The Caravan.

Keywords: RSS Akal Takht Hindu Rashtra Mohan Bhagwat Rashtriya Sikh Sangat
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