For the Porters Employed by the Indian Army at Siachen, Both Help and Recognition Are Out of Reach

19 April 2016
On 27 February 2016, when the 40-year-old porter Thukjey Gyasket fell into a crevasse at the Siachen glacier, Stanzin Padma was immediately flown in to be a part of the team that recovered Gyasket’s body.
Courtesy Stanzin Padma
On 27 February 2016, when the 40-year-old porter Thukjey Gyasket fell into a crevasse at the Siachen glacier, Stanzin Padma was immediately flown in to be a part of the team that recovered Gyasket’s body.
Courtesy Stanzin Padma

In the hamlets around the Siachen base camp of the Indian army, Stanzin Padma is known as a saviour. On 27 February 2016, when the 40-year-old porter Thukjey Gyasket fell into a crevasse at the Siachen glacier, Padma was immediately flown in to be a part of the team that recovered Gyasket’s body. Padma’s expertise of crevasses began with a traumatic incident—in 2012, he fell into one, and was miraculously rescued the next day. Later that year, Padma lowered himself into a crevasse to rescue a fellow porter. In 2014, he saved two soldiers buried under the snow from an avalanche in which he too had been caught. Such incidents earned Padma the reputation of being invincible—a hero.

Padma is one of over 500 local men currently employed as porters for the Indian army at the Siachen glacier in Ladakh, in Jammu and Kashmir, a disputed site that is infamous for being both the world’s highest and one of the most brutal battlegrounds. Since the Indian army moved into the region in 1984, it has employed residents of local villages, who are familiar with the perilous terrain, as porters. The porters’ job was to carry loads—about 20 kilogrammes—to army posts on the glacier. Today, many porters said, their jobs have expanded to include fixing ropes to help the soldiers climb the glacier, stocking the posts with provisions, maintaining the stock of kerosene, and digging out ice to melt it into water for daily use.

At the altitude and freezing temperatures of the Siachen, where even basic tasks such as eating, drinking, walking and breathing prove tough, the porters become the lifeline of the forces. Their familiarity with the terrain has also made them indispensible in search and rescue operations after mishaps, such as the avalanche earlier this year that claimed the lives of 10 soldiers, including Lance Naik Hanamanthappa, a soldier who was rescued but later succumbed to his injuries.

Preksha Sharma is an assistant editor at The Indian Quarterly.

Keywords: labour Indian Army Jammu and Kashmir Siachen Porters
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