Bearing The Cross

Pakistan’s Christians struggle to keep the faith

01 February 2018
A Christian woman shows a journalist a charred Bible outside her torched house in the town of Gojra in Pakistan’s Punjab province. Her home had been attacked during the 2009 mob violence in the area, in which eight Christians were killed.
MOHSIN RAZA/REUTERS
A Christian woman shows a journalist a charred Bible outside her torched house in the town of Gojra in Pakistan’s Punjab province. Her home had been attacked during the 2009 mob violence in the area, in which eight Christians were killed.
MOHSIN RAZA/REUTERS

THE RIDES AT LAHORE’S famous Gulshan-e-Iqbal Park open for business at around 5 pm. Hundreds of people mill around the sprawling 66-acre park all day, and the most enthusiastic of them—the children—wait for ride operators to take up their positions in small cabins, from where they run a giant Ferris wheel, merry-go-rounds and fancy swirling teacups. The park is open to people from all backgrounds, but on Easter Sunday of 2016, a particularly large number of the park’s estimated 30,000 visitors were Christians.

At around 6.25 pm, most of the visitors were packed into the fairground area near Gate 5, where dozens of children had queued in front of two popular rides. Just then, between the two rides and Gate 5, a suicide bomber detonated ten kilograms of explosives packed inside his vest. The blast killed at least 72 people, and although the attackers had announced that they were targeting the Christians celebrating Easter, most of the victims were Muslim.

The attack was claimed by Jamaat-ul-Ahrar, a splinter group of the militant organisation Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan. Jamaat-ul-Ahrar had also claimed the twin suicide bombings at churches in Lahore’s Youhanabad area the year before, which had killed over 20 people and sparked a violent protest in the locality that left two Muslim men dead. But there was no protest this time.

Sarah Eleazar is a Lahore-based journalist.

Keywords: Pakistan Christians Pakistan Muslim League Nawaz communal violence religious exclusion Islamic Fundamentalism religious minorities Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaaf
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