Why the panchayat elections in Kashmir hold little meaning

21 October 2018
The panchayat elections in Kashmir are scheduled to be conducted from 17 November to 11 December. Multiple former sarpanches said they would not contest elections again because during their tenure, they had to navigate threats of violence by militant organisations as well as deal with the government’s unwillingness to empower the panchayat institutions.
Mukhtar Khan/AP
The panchayat elections in Kashmir are scheduled to be conducted from 17 November to 11 December. Multiple former sarpanches said they would not contest elections again because during their tenure, they had to navigate threats of violence by militant organisations as well as deal with the government’s unwillingness to empower the panchayat institutions.
Mukhtar Khan/AP

In September 2018, the chief electoral officer of Jammu and Kashmir declared that municipal and panchayat elections will be conducted in the state this year. The municipal elections were conducted from 8 October to 16 October and the panchayat elections are scheduled to be conducted from 17 November to 11 December. Shortly after the announcement, I met Khalida Begum, who served as the last sarpanch of Wagub in the state’s Baramula district from 2011 till 2016. She was not contesting in the upcoming elections. “I think hardly anyone will come to vote for me [now] because I was not allowed to match their expectations.” Begum said she was discouraged to perform her duties by government officials—every time she visited their offices, they ignored her applications and queries. “I never got the support I needed.”

According to the Jammu and Kashmir Panchayati Raj Act, 1989, panchayat elections are to be conducted in the state every five years for three tiers—at the halqa level, the block development council and the district development and planning boards. A halqa is an area comprising a village or such contiguous number of villages as determined by the government. The sarpanches and panches of a halqa are directly elected and the members of the other two tiers are indirectly elected by those elected to the halqa.

Irfan Hafeez, a 38-year-old social activist and lawyer, said, “I don’t call it panchayat system because only one tier of it actually exists.” After the last statewide panchayat elections, in 2011, only the halqa panchayats were operational. The elections for the block development council and the district development and planning boards were postponed indefinitely.

Zubair Lone is an independent multimedia journalist.

Keywords: Panchayat Panchayati Raj sarpanch Kashmir halqa panchayat Shopian Baramula Burhan Wani local governance
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