As JKCCS’s Khurram Parvez faces NIA raid, a look at its latest report, Kashmir’s Internet Siege

30 October 2020
A woman showing blood stains on the wall of her teenage son’s room. The woman said that security forces picked up her son, Arif, on 19 August 2019 in Srinagar’s Buchpora area. “The police hit Arif a lot and blood started oozing from his face,” she said. According to her neighbours, ten young boys were arrested that night.
SANNA IRSHAD MATTOO
A woman showing blood stains on the wall of her teenage son’s room. The woman said that security forces picked up her son, Arif, on 19 August 2019 in Srinagar’s Buchpora area. “The police hit Arif a lot and blood started oozing from his face,” she said. According to her neighbours, ten young boys were arrested that night.
SANNA IRSHAD MATTOO

On 28 October and 29 October, the National Investigation Agency conducted searches at several locations in Jammu and Kashmir in connection with a case related to the funding of “secessionist and separatist activities.” Among those subjected to the raids was Khurram Parvez, the programme coordinator of the civil-society group Jammu Kashmir Coalition of Civil Society. 

Parvez has long been a vocal critic of the ruling government, and was arrested for two and a half months in 2016. Two days before his arrest, the Indian immigration authorities had refused to let Parvez board a flight to Geneva, where he was scheduled to address the United Nations Human Rights Council about India’s human-rights record. The Jammu and Kashmir High Court had quashed his detention as “illegal.” 

The JKCCS has published several reports on human rights violations in Kashmir in the past. The following is an extract from its latest report, titled “Kashmir’s Internet Siege,” on mass detentions and the justice system amid internet restrictions post the abrogation of the erstwhile state’s special status on 5 August 2019.

In September 2019, an all-woman fact-finding team from India visited Kashmir and reported that in the run-up to 5 August, and in the weeks immediately after, an estimated 13,000 Kashmiris, many of them teenagers, were picked up from their homes and arbitrarily detained by police and armed forces, often in midnight raids. There was frequently no record of their arrest, and authorities remained tight-lipped about the numbers taken into custody as well as the legal basis for their detentions. J&K government spokesman Rohit Kansal could only confirm that more than hundred local politicians, activists and academics were detained in the first few days after the lockdown began and said there was “no centralised figure” for the total number of people detained. The detenus included three former chief ministers of J&K State: Farooq Abdullah, Omar Abdullah and Mehbooba Mufti. On 20 November 2019, Parliament was informed by the Government of India that “5,161 persons were detained since August 5th out of whom 609 were [still] under detention while rest were released.” There was no official statement on how many were booked under the Public Safety Act, 1978 (PSA) a widely criticised preventive detention law that permits imprisonment without charges or trial. Data obtained by JKCCS , showed that 662 fresh PSA detentions were registered in 2019, two-thirds of them after 5 August 2019. 

“Most of the people arrested were from poor families and did not know what they had to do once their relative was arrested,” Habeel Iqbal, a lawyer practicing at the Shopian District Court told researchers from JKCCS about those arrested after 5 August 2019. “A key document for those detained under the PSA is the Detention Order containing the charges, and for it to be challenged in court, it has to first be accessed from the district commissioner’s office. Contacting a lawyer was impossible amidst the lockdown, especially for those living in rural areas, and in the absence of public transport so was going to Srinagar to find legal representation,” Iqbal added. 

Keywords: Khurram Parvez Jammu and Kashmir
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